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Around The Dial: Broadcast News Today

David Farrell's picture

News about media and the regulatory environment both inside and beyond Canada's borders.

 

Fate of CMJ Uncertain at best

New York: One of the remaining bastions of the college-rock era has fallen silent, at least for now. For the second week in a row, CMJ has not published its weekly college radio charts, calling into question the fate of an institution that has tracked the music played by US college stations around the country since 1978. No date has been set for when the charts will resume.

Adam Klein, who owns CMJ through his Abaculi Media, has not responded to requests for comment on the matter – Marc Hogan, Pitchfork

Corus transformation underwhelming

Investors now have two full quarters by which to evaluate Corus Ent.’s $2.65B acquisition of Shaw Media assets. Seeking Alpha posits that the results have been less than impressive.

 

PC’s not supporting CBC privatization bill

The Conservative caucus is going to oppose leadership candidate Brad Trost’s private member’s bill — the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Privatization Act — which is up for debate Friday, according to Trost campaign spokesman Mike Patton.

“What’s super interesting is the official decision by the Conservative Party of Canada caucus in the House of Commons … that the caucus’s position is not to support (Saskatoon-University PC  MP) Brad’s private member’s bill to privatize the CBC and not to support the concept of the privatization of the CBC,” Patton said in a video message he tweeted out Thursday – iPolitics

News aggregators oppose ‘punitive’ media tax proposal

Proposals for tax changes aimed at helping Canadian publishers fight for revenues with online news aggregators would result in a punitive "tax on advertisers,'' executives from Google Canada and Facebook Canada told a Commons committee studying the country's media industry.

That's because tax laws currently on the books designed to prop up the industry are archaic and simply don't apply to the Internet age, Jason Kee, Google Canada's head of policy and government relations, told the heritage committee Tuesday.

Kee said he had concerns over how such changes would be implemented.

"Long story short, it's essentially a tax on Canadian advertisers,'' he said – Terry Pedwell, The Canadian Press

 

Erica Farber with Matt Cundill

Erica Farber of the Radio Advertising Bureau recently joined Matt Cundill in the studio for one of his ‘Sound Off’ podcasts that can be heard below.