Media Beat
Media Beat

Media Beat: September 09, 2021

Julian Taylor syndicating new 3-hour radio show

Julian Taylor’s Jukebox, a new 3-hour radio show, launches this coming Sunday as the popular ELMNT-FM afternoon drive-show host and established roots musician quits his day job to enter the lucrative but competitive radio syndication market.

Taylor’s Jukebox show sounds to be a sort of cross between Live At Daryl’s House and Little Steven’s Underground Garage, but instead of garage rock, he will be spinning music from all genres but with a focus on BIPOC and Independent artists like himself.

Taylor’s venture is represented by Greg Nisbet’s RadioMogul, where it will be streamed Sundays 3-6pm EST, and simulcast on ELMNT’s FM stations in Ottawa and Toronto.

First Peoples Radio and RadioMogul are partners with Taylor in the new venture.

“On my show, listeners can expect to hear what I would play them if we were hanging out at my place”, Taylor explains. “It’s all-inclusive, and I'll be spinning stuff that I love to listen to. I can’t think of another show on the radio where you’d hear this diverse a selection of great music.”

As well as hosting, Taylor serves as an Executive Producer.

The move to syndication is his own idea, in part motivated by a desire to spend more time with his 11-year-old daughter, who returns to school for the new academic year. Separately, he tells the column he’s at work on recording a new album, the theme of which he’s keeping close to his vest. His last album, The Ridge, earning him two 2021 Juno nominations, a place on the 2021 Polaris Prize long list, a Canadian Folk Music Award and over 4 million streams worldwide.

First Peoples Radio President & CEO Jean LaRose is clearly on board with the new venture. In a statement, he said: “We are extremely excited about this new show, and this new partnership,” adding that “Julian has built up a real rapport with many of our listeners and we think this is a great way to continue building on that.”

Drake teams up with ESPN

The Six sensation has teamed up with ESPN to select music for 10 Monday night football games. Natch, he’s including some of his own, including tracks from his latest Certified Lover Boy long-play, and others he’s keen to showcase and promote.

“Now we are here, the kickoff of the football season and who better to curate music for Monday Night Football than Drake who sits firmly at the intersection of music and sports?" ESPN sports marketing VP Emeka Ofodile said in a statement. "We couldn’t be more excited for this upcoming collaboration. The music curator role has been a big hit with our fans with Diplo and DJ Khaled in previous years, and this season we will be living inside the moment with Drake as our NFL on ESPN soundtrack.”

For broadcasters, a great deal is riding on the outcome of the Canadian election

The stakes in this election are extremely high for CBC, Bell, Corus Entertainment, Rogers, Québecor, Postmedia, Torstar, and other media companies.

That's because the Conservatives' election platform promises fairly major changes that will drive down CBC revenues. That offers opportunities for the private media companies to increase their market share of advertising.

Let's first look at the CBC's budget.

In 2019-20, $1.21 billion of the CBC's $1.71 billion in revenues came from the federal government (including amortization of deferred capital funding). That's more than a 70-percent federal subsidy.

The Crown corporation posted a $59.1-million loss last year. Yet its retained earnings and total equity still rose by more than $200 million to $921.2 million due to remeasurements of defined benefit plans.

It means that CBC is in excellent financial shape. The public broadcaster is benefitting from a Liberal decision to allow it to sell digital advertising on cbc.ca.

But if O'Toole becomes prime minister, he plans a big shakeup. – Charlie Smith, The Georgia Straight

25-year-old internal memo to Canada Revenue Agency predicted foreign money distorting housing market

An internal Canada Revenue Agency audit concluded 25 years ago that wealthy new immigrants were buying up most of the priciest houses taken from a sample in and around Vancouver while declaring poverty on their tax returns. But the report was not made public until a five-year access-to-information battle concluded recently.

Housing and immigration academics say the study could have warned the public about the scale of foreign money being parked in Metro Vancouver’s residential real estate – decades before the provincial government began taking meaningful action to slow this trend.

During the federal election campaign, all three major parties have proposed various policies to curb international demand for real estate, which has contributed to rising unaffordability in a number of urban centres. – Mike Hager, The Globe and Mail

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