Media Beat
Media Beat

Media Beat: March 24, 2019

Canadian Priest stabbed during a live-streamed morning mass

Footage broadcast Friday on a Catholic television station and picked up by the top-rated CTV network showed a man in jeans, parka and white baseball cap approach Claude Grou at St. Joseph's Oratory in Montreal, in front of 60 horrified parishioners.

Grou recovered enough to get to his feet and is seen backing away as security officers surround the assailant, who drops his knife. Three guards restrained him while others tended to Grou, who appeared to be in shock. – AFP

Ford says social media allows politicians to circumvent mainstream journalists

Premier Doug Ford says mainstream journalists have become irrelevant because social media enables him to speak directly to Ontarians.

Speaking at the annual Manning Networking Conference Saturday, Ford said that journalists are “losing the battle” to inform people about the news and accused them of being "far-left" and intent on distorting the messages of politicians. – Joan Bryden, The Canadian Press

Pierre Karl Peladeau believes our broadcast system is broken

“How can it be that the carriage rates of Bell’s channels went up even as their audience share fell by six percentage points in Québec between 2014 and 2018? During the same period, TVA Group’s channels increased their audience share by five percentage points and yet the subscription revenues they received from the carriers have not changed significantly. Why is it that after making investments comparable to RDS, TVA Sports collects almost 40% less in subscription revenues? That LCN, Québec’s most-watched specialty channel, has an audience share 2.1 percentage points higher than RDI but lower subscription fees?

Unfortunately, the answer is very clear. The regulatory body doesn’t care to promote innovation and competition…” – PK Peladeau, Cartt.ca

Andrew Coyne: It's when you read details of media bailout that the chill sets in

If this goes through, everything will be subsidized: print, broadcast, the works — a whole industry of CBCs. You couldn’t do a better job killing the news business. – National Post

Sunday, for the first time, announcers called the NHL broadcast in Cree

Fans tuning in to watch the Carolina Hurricanes take on the Montreal Canadiens on Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) witnessed history in the making on Sunday when Iron and Wood and retired NHL player John Chabot provided commentary and analysis, broadcasting out of APTN's Winnipeg studios during the game. – Shane Gibson, CBC News

How the media let malicious idiots take over

In an age of 24-hour news, declining ratings and intense competition, the commodity in greatest demand is noise. Never mind the content, never mind the facts: all that now counts is impact. A loudmouthed buffoon, already the object of public outrage, is a far more bankable asset than someone who knows what they’re talking about. So the biggest platforms are populated by blusterers and braggarts. The media is the mirror in which we see ourselves. With every glance, our self-image subtly changes. – George Monbiot, The Guardian

Media fragmentation is annoying consumers

From streaming services to pay TV to gaming platforms to video games, Americans are “piecing together” their media and entertainment options to suit their needs. But consumers say they have to work hard to find their desired content–and pay for multiple subscriptions–to have it their way. Will the costs start to outweigh the benefits? – Deloitte Media Survey

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